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Literature and Science

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In 1959 C. P. Snow memorably described the `gulf of mutual incomprehension' which existed between `literary intellectuals' and scientists, referring to them as `two cultures'. This volume looks at the extent to which this has changed. Ranging from the middle ages to twentieth-century science fiction and literary theory, and using different texts, genres, and methodologies, the essays collected here demonstrate the complexity of literature, science, and the interfaces between them. Texts and authors discussed include Ian McEwan's Saturday; Sheridan le Fanu; The Birth of Mankind; Franco Morretti; Anna Barbauld; Dorothy L. Sayers; The Cloud of Unknowing; George Eliot and Mary Wollstonecraft.

Dr SHARON RUSTON is Senior Lecturer in English at the University of Keele. CONTRIBUTORS: SHARON RUSTON, GILLIAN RUDD, ELAINE HOBBY, ALICE JENKINS, KATY PRICE, MARTIN WILLIS, BRIAN BAKER, DAVID AMIGONI

Reviews

A strong collection [...] presenting confident, unforced analyses synthesising science, literature and popular culture. REVIEW OF ENGLISH STUDIES

Details

First Published: 17 Jul 2008
13 Digit ISBN: 9781843841784
Pages: 188
Size: 21.6 x 13.8
Binding: Hardback
Imprint: D.S.Brewer
Series: Essays and Studies
Subject: Medieval Literature
BIC Class: DSBB

Details updated on 24 Apr 2014

Contents

  • 1  From Popular Science to Contemplation: the Clouds of The Cloud of Unknow ing
  • 2  "Dreams and Plain Dotage": the Value of The Birth of Mankind [1540-1 654]
  • 3  Natural Rights and Natural History in Anna Barbauld and Mary Wollstonecraft
  • 4  George Eliot, Geometry and Gender
  • 5  On the Back of the Light Waves: Novel Possibilities in the "Fourth Dimensio n"
  • 6  Le Fanu's "Carmilla", Ireland, and Diseased Vision
  • 7  Evolution, Literary History and Science Fiction
  • 8  "The Luxury of Storytelling": Science, Literature and Cultural Contest in Ian McEwan's Narrative Practice